Bringing your puppy home

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It’s time to bring your labradoodle home — congratulations! This is an exciting time for you and your family (including your newest family member: your labradoodle puppy!) Whether you live in the woods in Maine or on the beach in Florida, there are a few things every puppy and puppy owner needs. We’ve compiled our list of favorite items to help make your puppy’s transition to your home as seamless as possible. Please remember that this is by no means a required list or prescription for puppy perfection, only items that we’ve found to be helpful and high quality. [title size=”2″]Reading[/title]

[title size=”2″]Toys[/title] In our experience, labradoodle puppies do better when they have access to lots of chew toys and balls. When they have toys to chew on, they’re much less likely to chew on your shoes! Toy size should reflect labradoodle size.

  • Kong – begin with the small blue puppy Kong; feel free to stuff with treats (like peanut butter!)
  • Nylabone – begin with the more flexible puppy bone; avoid edible Nylabone (they’re prone to breaking off into little pieces)
  • Plush squeaky toys – make sure to monitor the condition of these toys; mend or discard when stuffing begins to leak
  • Soft, durable rubber squeaky toys
  • Tennis ball

When you bring your labradoodle home, ADEL will give you a care package starter kit containing a puppy chew bone, a Kong, and two soft toys. [title size=”2″]Food[/title] We recommend human grade dog foods that do not have grains in them (most brands with grains have excessive fillers in them). Make sure to check the ingredients list; you’re looking for dog foods with meats, vegetables, fruits, and minerals in them. Please do some research to familiarize yourself with the different dog foods available. It’s best to get your dog food locally, so if you’re researching online click the link to “find a store near you”. You can also ask your local quality pet store if they can make a special order for you and your labradoodle. Quick tip: When changing your puppy’s food, try to purchase a smaller bag. You want to make sure the new food agrees with your dog. Your labradoodle may become tired of the food you’re feeding him or her, so remember: change is good! If you’re able, change up your pup’s food every month or so. Adorable Down East Labradoodle Recommended Dog Chow:

[title size=”2″]Accessories[/title] Have fun buying stuff for your labradoodle! Go to a local pet store or PetEdge.com and shop around!

  • Crate – There are two kinds of crates: metal wire and plastic. The latter your dog can travel in by air. The crate should be big enough to allow your doodle to stand, turn around, and lie down at full maturity. (Full size for most ADEL labradoodles is: 20-22″ tall, 14-18″ wide, 20″ long.)
  • Bedding – The bed should fit in your crate, at least at first. It should be at least 1″ thick and made of soft material. When your labradoodle is house-trained, we recommend a thicker, bigger bed for the floor.
  • Brush and comb
  • Puppy shampoo
  • Water and food dishes – metal, non-tip type. We do not recommend plastic dishes. Porcelain is okay as long as it is not made in China and does not contain lead paint.
  • Leash and adjustable puppy halter – size your puppy when you pick him/her up.

[title size=”2″]Medicine[/title] To our displeasure, we have ticks in Maine (and New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, etc…!) To fight these pesky pests, we recommend Frontline and Revolution (PetShed.com has great prices). Remember not use these two products simultaneously. It is okay, however, to alternate between the two every month. With our labradoodles, we use Revolution in July and December to control heart worm. We use Frontline the rest of the year when ticks and mosquitoes are out. [title size=”2″]Important Information[/title]

  • Animal Poison Control Center – 888-426-4435
  • One ounce of baker’s chocolare per 10 pounds of dog weight is lethal if immediate help is not sought. Induce vomiting immediately by soaking a piece of bread with a liberal amount of hydrogen peroxide and feeding to the dog. Vomiting will occur 1-2 minutes after ingestion. Call your vet and visit an emergency animal hospital immediately.
  • Grapes and raisins are also poisonous to dogs.
  • To discourage undesirable chewing, spray bitter apple or lime juice.
  • To clean up and deodorize puppy accidents, use Nature’s Miracle.
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